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The 10 Vital Webs Stats

Your web stats are an important collection of information regarding your site’s visitors, referrals, and other essential information.   This information is important to you because it can help you measure the success of your marketing campaign, determine where to improve your site and how to tweak your site for success!

Below are ten vital elements of your web stats and why you should study them.

1. Unique Visitors – This component will tell you exactly how many people have come to your website.  No matter how many pages this visitor clicks to, he is counted as one visitor.  You need to utilize this statistic to see if your traffic is improving over time or getting worse.  This will help you determine if you need to enhance your search engine rankings and other methods of getting traffic.

2. Location of Visitors – Knowing where your visitors are coming from is important because you can research how to reach a wider worldwide target market.  You can see where the largest percentage of people are coming from and work on expanding your global visitor base.

3. Search Phrases – Your web stats will let you know exactly what search phrases/keywords people are using to get to your site.  Studying this critical component can help you fine tune and improve your keywords and site content for better placement in the search engines.

4. Referrals – Referrals are websites or pages from which your visitors have found you.  Study them to find out where your traffic originated and exactly how they found you.  You can find out who is linking to you and which of your articles are bringing you more traffic.  You can then submit these popular articles to more sites.

5.  Pages – This item will help you determine which of your site’s pages are the most popular and which ones are not visited much.  Analyze this info to see why some pages are so well travelled and some are not being used much at all.

6. Entry and Exit Pages – Analyze this information to find out where people are entering your site and from which page they leave the most.  This can help you stress your sales pitch more on certain pages and learn how to keep visitors from leaving other pages.  Put special offers on popular landing pages.  Spice up or add more interest to pages from which people are leaving.  Study those pages to see what could be making them leave as opposed to exploring additional pages.

7. Time of Day – Your web stats will tell you the time of day when each visitor came to your site and visited individual pages.  This can help you schedule chats and/or webinars and can help you determine when to publish new content and/or special offers and sales.

8.  Days of the Week – This information will help you in much the same way time of day stats help you.  Study the stats to find out when to offer specials, teleclasses, chats, contests etc.

9. Length of Visits – This critical information can help you find out if people are lingering on your site and taking the time to read the content or if they are clicking a page and leaving almost immediately.  Studying this information can help you find where to improve your pages and find ways to get your visitors to stay longer.

10. Error Reports – Find out if people are having trouble accessing any of your pages and getting error codes.  With this info, you can correct these errors promptly so people will not leave your site.

Web stats can look overwhelming and seem a daunting task but it is vital that you learn what all the statistics mean and how to interpret the information they give you.  Look at the statistics as a whole to find out the trends but also study the individual stats to see how you can refine your site and your marketing campaigns to bring you more traffic and longer visits to your site, thus increasing the chance for more sales conversions.

About the Author:
Terri Seymour has over twelve years of online experience and has helped many people start their own business.  Visit her site for free articles, resources, information, resell ebooks and more.  Sign up for the RSS Feed for a free business ebook with MRR. http://www.SeymourProducts.com

Creating separate databases and logins phpmyadmin on WAMP server

Editing and hacking your website in the live environment can be risky – a useful approach is to install WAMP server locally on your laptop, load up you website software, then carry out your hacks in a safe environment. Now we have set up correctlyas shown in the last tutorial creating separate logins for each application is very straightforward. Let’s assume I am going to create a local WordPress  instance on my laptop.

The next steps creates the logins:

  • Login to phpmyadmin user the root user and password
  • From the home administration screen go to the tab ‘Privileges’:

  • Select ‘Add a new User’ about a quarter of the way down on the left.

add user phpMyAdmin

  • The rest of the Add User dialogue opens up as shown.
  • Enter wordpress for the user name
  • Select local from the host drop down and localhost will appear in the field to the right.
  • Enter wordpress for the password (repeat wordpress in the retype box)
  • Select  the checkbox ‘Create database with same name and grant all privileges’
  • Check All for global privileges if you wish

create a data base same name user

Scroll down to the bottom of the screen and hit GO as shown on the screen shot.

select go to create the datebase

That’s it

The direct execution panel for SQL will show the query being run and the creation of the new databases along with the credentials we entered above.

Log out of root and you will go back to the initial login screen. To check all is OK just re login with the username ‘wordpress’ and password ‘wordpress’ to check all is in order.

Next:

  • Download the latest distribution of WordPress from www.wordpress.org (currently 3.1)
  • Unzip the package and copy the wordpress folder to the httpdocs folder usually c:\wamp\www\httpdocs\
  • When you have loaded wordpress to the httpdocs directory on the laptop  open up localhost from the wampserver services tab navigate to the wordpress directory and the famous wordpress install routine will start up. Just fill in the db user and password as ‘wordpress’ and enter the default user details and the install completes in about two seconds.

When that is complete just create an alias to wordpress or bookmark the local site to complete the process.

Repeat the above for each local application you wish to install.

So give it a try

Royston

Creating a login screen in phpMyAdmin

When installing local applications on your laptop to run on WAMP server it is often useful to create separate databases and logins for the applications so you can keep things in order. There are several ways to do this but I thought I would set down a step by step process that dummies such as me could follow.

So if you wish to install WordPress, Mantis or Limesurvey as local applications this short tutorial shows you how to do it.

When WAMP server is first installed the root user is created with no password and as default no login intermediate screen is available.

The first task is to edit the phpMyAdmin config file to correct this:

  • Navigate to C:\wamp\apps\phpmyadmin3.3.9
  • And open config.inc.php in wordpad
  • Define two passwords yourpasswordA and yourpasswordB
  • Add the changes to your config .inc.php file  as shown in red below
  • Save the file and close WordPad

Config.inc.php changes:

$cfg[‘blowfish_secret’] = ‘yourpasswordA’;

/* Servers configuration */
$i = 0;

/* Server: localhost [1] */
$i++;
$cfg[‘Servers’][$i][‘verbose’] = ‘localhost’;
$cfg[‘Servers’][$i][‘host’] = ‘localhost’;
$cfg[‘Servers’][$i][‘port’] = ”;
$cfg[‘Servers’][$i][‘socket’] = ”;
$cfg[‘Servers’][$i][‘connect_type’] = ‘tcp’;
$cfg[‘Servers’][$i][‘extension’] = ‘mysqli’;
$cfg[‘Servers’][$i][‘auth_type’] = ‘cookie‘;
$cfg[‘Servers’][$i][‘user’] = ‘root’;
$cfg[‘Servers’][$i][‘password’] = yourpasswordB‘;
$cfg[‘Servers’][$i][‘AllowNoPassword’] = false;

/* End of servers configuration */

$cfg[‘DefaultLang’] = ‘en-utf-8’;
$cfg[‘ServerDefault’] = 1;
$cfg[‘UploadDir’] = ”;
$cfg[‘SaveDir’] = ”;

/* rajk – for blobstreaming */
$cfg[‘Servers’][$i][‘bs_garbage_threshold’] = 50;
$cfg[‘Servers’][$i][‘bs_repository_threshold’] = ’32M’;
$cfg[‘Servers’][$i][‘bs_temp_blob_timeout’] = 600;
$cfg[‘Servers’][$i][‘bs_temp_log_threshold’] = ’32M’;

Next go to the WAMP server services panel and select phpMyAdmin

A login screen will appear as shown below – enter your login details as:

Username :Root

Password: yourpasswordB

Login Screen for phpMyAdmin

You will then be taken to the phpMyAdmin administration screen where you see you have logged in a root@localhost if all has gone well – this is the screen you normally go to when no login routine is in place.

admin screen phpmyadmin

Next step creating logins

Creating a Best Practice Self Service Intranet

Self Service Best Practice

A lot of dollars have been invested by companies on implementing internal web sites and more recently on developing HR applications for the intranet to facilitate employee and management ‘self-service’. This idea makes a lot of sense as it helps to increase employee engagement with company goals and procedures as well as reducing workload on internal key personnel and outsourced service companies. This can remove from them the often routine day-to-day trivia enabling them to become more focused on what matters and enables them to control their costs.

As well as this intranets can provide a greater degree of flexibility for individuals and groups as well as assist in the creation of a ‘learning organization’ where change becomes easier and embedded. However, despite what seems to be obvious benefits to both the individual and the organization overall practice shows us that utilisation of these systems is generally very low.

This post offers some best practice pointers we can follow to ensure employees are motivated to use company intranets and self- service facilities.

  • Make sure each business area or department whose services are being delivered on the intranet are involved in the design, implementation, evolution and diffusion of their web sections. Better still, ensure they plan and define their expectations and use of the web to ensure goal attainment – the system is far more likely to be effective if it is business needs driven.
  • Ensure that the end users are monitored continuously and asked for feedback on the design and useability and any later changes you decide to implement.
  • These sorts of initiatives must have enthusiastic support from the very top – and make sure that this is disseminated in a controlled manner.
  • Ensure all information on your intranet is important and relevant to user’s jobs and of benefit to them in their work – it should also be up to date. If you can include aspects of work that they must use, or will be motivated to use because it is simpler (such as booking vacation on line or clearing expenses), that will help increase usage.
  • Make available a searchable, easy to navigate, repository of information. Whilst care should be taken not to overload people with too much information, research shows staff can become more productive if they have easy access on the intranet to a range of standard company documentation.
  • Give recognition for any work published or pages developed to those who created the content. This not only increases motivation but ensures changes can be communicated to the right person, increasing accuracy and reliability.
  • Technically the system must be fast, reliable, and easy to use. If not and staff have to invest time finding information, or struggle with using the system, they will give up. There are detailed best practice guidelines for the technical development of websites available, which include best use of colour, format and content presentation, identifying new items, ensuring no broken links, and reducing the number of clicks/ease of navigation. These should be adhered to.

Things to Avoid:

  • Do not leave it all to the IT department to organise. They can only take responsibility for the technical aspects, not motivating individuals or selling business practices. The strategic effectiveness of intranets can also be adversely affected if content and structure is left solely to IT.
  • Do not assume that staff will start to use it in time, or after a short initial training course. They will need good reasons for using the system as well as ease of use – if there is no value they will not use it!
  • Do not use as a general data repository or an uncontrolled mass-communication device. People suffering from information overload actually reduce the time and effort spent on the system and can miss the information that is valuable. Focus on the relevant.

Developing these areas of best practice should enable companies to ensure that investment in intranets is not wasted and users will actually get some benefit from accessing the information

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The Importance of a Simple well organised Website

One of the primary implications of a well-organized / good website is to keep your visitors in the website. A website is definitely created for a purpose, unless intended for personal use, which is the minority. For example, a portfolio website would want to be visited and its content viewed. For companies and internet businesses, your website certainly aims to provide product information, to make sales, or somewhat similar. However, most individuals undoubtedly prefer visually captivating designs, so on and so forth. It is undeniable that this causes no harm, but one must put himself/herself in other people’s shoes, as to understand how a visitor to the website might think, do and react.

Navigation

A web designer has to learn how to think the way your visitors think for example of the following 2 scenarios:

Situation A: Website with good navigation (2-3 hyperlinks to target page), well planned in terms of placement, and design.

Situation B: Website with poor navigation (takes forever for the visitor to reach his/her target page), hard-to-read navigation fonts and poor placement of the navigation buttons/bar.

In Situation A, a visitor will always want to be able to access his/her target page. For example, the individual comes across your website, and is interested in the product sold, but wants to find more information. He/she finds the navigation with no trouble, and enters the particular product information page.

As for Situation B, a visitor stumbles into the website, and would also like to find out more information about the product. Unfortunately, due to bad placement and fanciful font-types, the visitor takes forever, or even fails to find the navigation bar. Even when he/she does so, links to the product information are nowhere to be found, (example : home > about > products > product image > etc.[a few more clicks] > product information ).

Analysis: In both situations, wouldn’t a website with characteristics similar to the Situation A be more rewarding ergo better?